Posts Tagged ‘Chaplain’

  

“Therefore put on the full armor of God, so that when the day of evil comes, you may be able to stand your ground, and after you have done everything, to stand.” (Ephesians‬ ‭6‬:‭13‬ NIV)

In his book, The Blue and the Gray, James Robertson shares a story about a cowardly Confederate Chaplain:

“We got into a little row with the Yankees a few days ago and our parson, deeming, no doubt, that discretion was the better part of valor, took to his heels when the shells commenced flying and I have not seen him since. A New England officer who had witnessed the same misbehavior insisted that ‘undue susceptibility to cannon fever were ample grounds for the disqualification of a chaplain.'”

Standing our ground can be tough to do. While we may not face a barrage of Civil War cannons, we do face public pressure, peer sentiment, and relational confrontations. The last thing God needs is cowards on the front line, caving in to popular opinion or flat-out false beliefs in order to save face or keep a church pew filled! The right thing will always be the right thing, regardless of pop culture’s windblown preferences!

Being brave isn’t always easy, so let God help you. He gives you the strength to do it, the backing to stand with you, and the healing of the heart afterwards. But caving in to cowardice will always lead to heartache! Stand your ground! You are loved today! 

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Today, if only you would hear His voice, do not harden your hearts…” (Psalm‬ ‭95‬:‭7-8‬ NIV)

Rev. Samuel Agnew was one of several pastors that served the South as a chaplain during the Civil War. He shared in a journal entry from March 27, 1864, of a spiritual drought he felt was taking place among the soldiers:

“There is a lamentable torpor among the [soldiers] in reference to their souls. They hear and attend the sanctuary but seem unaffected by the preacher’s word…More members were absent than ordinarily, and some who were present did not commune. There is a spiritual drought in that community. May God bless my labors…”

Is it possible to love God and come to Church, yet still miss God? Absolutely! A spiritual drought can occur when we simply ignore God. In Psalm 95, the psalmist instructs the people to worship God, but to be careful not to harden your heart afterwards. It doesn’t matter how much “outflow” we are producing for God; if there’s no “inflow” of His presence, we lose!

Take time this week to allow God’s presence to “rain” on your soul. His voice ends all spiritual droughts in your life! Worship cannot happen until inspiration commences! You are loved today!